2017-2018 Exhibition Season

September 2017

Sterling Allen: Backdrop & Blocker
September 22 - October 22, 2017
O'Quinn Gallery

In this solo presentation by Sterling Allen, the Austin-based artist creates a site-specific sculpture-based installation that activates sight lines, architectural relationships, hanging conventions, and spatial connections, all while celebrating pop, the handmade, function, failure and the cheap illusion.

Essay by Betsy Huete.

Untitled, 2017
Mixed media on paper
15 5/8 x 22 inches

Katherine Trimble: Touch box
September 22 - October 22, 2017
Project Space

When does a sound become music? When does language break down into sound? What happens to live music if you can't see the performer? Houston-based artist and musician, Katherine Trimble asks her audience to contemplate the breakdown of sounds in an immersive site-specific installation entitled Touch Box.

Essay by Melissa Warak, Ph.D.

Touch Box, 2017
Custom room, tactile transducers, microphone, custom software
8.5’ x 6’ x 8.5’ / Dimensions variable

More

October 2017

Dia de los Muertos
October 27 - November 2, 2017

DECEMBER

2017/2018 Mural Celebration
Saturday, December 9, 2017
4–5:30 PM

2017/2018 Mural by Francesca Fuchs, Image by Peter Molick

Celebrate Lawndale's newest Mural Project and the artist, Francesca Fuchs, on Saturday, December 9th, from 4-5:30 pm! We will be toasting Fuchs with Prosecco and St. Arnold's with food on site.

With a few stripes and shapes in beige, soft whites, and simple grays, Francesca Fuchs transforms Lawndale's blank north wall into the illusion of cathedral pillars, starting a conversation with the building's iconic Art Deco façade and suggesting a deeper consideration of the role that art spaces play in contemporary society.

Collaged Collections Workshop
Sunday, December 10, 2017
1–3 PM
O'Quinn Gallery
$5 Lawndale Members; $10 Non-Members

Layla Luna, I'm Not Even Into Horses, 2016

Join Lawndale on Sunday, December 10th from 1 - 3 PM for our Collaged Collections Workshop inspired by Layla Luna's I Saw Nobody Coming, So I Went Instead. In this workshop, participants will use various collectible items such as shells, reproductions of prehistoric art, and coins to create collage composition inspired by Luna's work, which contemplates the meaning of objects we hold dear.

This workshop is $5 for Lawndale members and $10 for non-members. All ages are welcome! Space is limited (20). Purchase tickets here.

Conversation with the artist and Jeffrey J. Kripal
Wednesday, December 13, 2017
6:30 PM

Join Lawndale and frequent collaborators, Lynn Randolph and Jeffrey J. Kripal, J. Newton Rayzor Professor of Philosophy and Religious Thought at Rice University, in conversation about art, religion, and the spiritual in contemporary society.

Cocktails will begin at 6:30 PM, with the conversation beginning at 7 PM. This event is free and open to the public.

Gouache Painting Workshop
Sunday, December 17, 2017
1–3 PM
O'Quinn Gallery
$5 Lawndale Members; $10 Non-members

2017/2018 Mural by Francesca Fuchs, Image by Peter Molick

Celebrate the holiday season with Lawndale on Sunday, December 17th from 1-3 PM! Come create a holiday card with gouache paints inspired by Francesca Fuchs, creator of our 2017/2018 Mural Project, currently on view.

The workshop is $5 for Lawndale members and $10 for non-members. Space is limited (20). All ages welcome! Purchase tickets here.

JANUARY

Butch Jack: Playing in the Sandbox Too
November 17, 2017–January 7, 2018
O’Quinn Gallery
Essay by Pete Gershon

In his site-specific installations, Meredith "Butch" Jack constructs structural and sculptural vignettes from common materials. Playing in the Sandbox Too highlights the alternate use of those daily materials towards the same concerns of his more commercial works: small mysteries; personal loss; physical tension, imbalance, or peril; and mortality.

Meredith Jack was born in Kansas City, Kansas and grew up in the small, rural community of Tonganoxie, Kansas. His father was a construction contractor and the family business was involved with the construction and operation of grain storage facilities. He entered the University of Kansas in the fall of 1961 enrolled as a history major. After two years in the general education system he entered into the Bachelor of Fine Arts program in the Drawing and Painting Department. He graduated in 1967 with an emphasis in Printmaking. The next fall he enrolled as graduate student at Tyler School of Art, in Philadelphia, PA. and received the Master of Fine Arts degree in Sculpture in the spring of 1972. The next fall he accepted a teaching position at the University of Minnesota, Morris. In 1976 he relocated to Texas, settling in Houston after determining that neither Austin nor Dallas had the combination of art activity and intellectual climate that he was seeking. In 1977 he re-entered the teaching profession at Lamar University, where he is Emeritus Professor. He maintains his residence and studio in Houston.


Layla Luna: I Saw Nobody Coming, So I went Instead
November 17, 2017–January 7, 2018
Cavnar Gallery

With the mixed media works of I Saw Nobody Coming, So I Went Instead Layla Luna explores personal histories through personal collections. Building her own collections to document time and create stories in a pro-active manner Luna questions our reasoning for holding on to objects and creating our own collections and displays of those items; is it the object its self or the haunt of the memory tied to the object?

Layla Luna was born in Fort Worth, Texas in 1975. She received an MFA in Painting from Texas Christian University in 2016 and a BFA in Painting from Arizona State University in 2008. She studied at Massey University in Wellington, New Zealand where she obtained a Postgraduate Diploma in Fine Art in 2011. Artist-in-residence programs around the country have played a large role in feeding her need to explore and make work in new environments. Currently, Luna resides in Fort Worth, Texas with her husband, step-kiddo, and Kona, the world's greatest dog.


It Takes Time to Form an Object, 2016


Lynn Randolph: Between Worlds
Curated by Susie Kalil
October 6, 2017 – January 21, 2018

Opening Reception
October 6, 2017, 6 PM

Conversation with the artist and Jeffrey J. Kripal
Wednesday, December 13, 2017
7 PM

Frequent collaborators, Lawndale is pleased to present Lynn Randolph and Jeffrey J. Kripal, J. Newton Rayzor Professor of Philosophy and Religious Thought at Rice University, in conversation about art, religion, and the spiritual in contemporary society.

Between Worlds responds to Randolph's ongoing work with palliative care patients at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Comprised of approximately twenty drawings, these painstakingly rendered works deftly combine elements of the weird and scientific with acute psychological and metaphoric realism and builds bridges to the spiritual. In the words of curator Susie Kalil: "Lynn Randolph's drawings come to grips with the realities of who we are, a spiritual tenor both dire and redeeming. Her works have soul as well as nerve- a sustained shriek about power and morality in a new global era. The silent fear of dying informs Randolph's drawings, which ambush us with relentless personal conviction and spellbinding strangeness. Caught up in the medical paradigm of cure, we assent to heroic measures that may deprive us of final dignity. What is death and what does loss mean? What has happened to death as a community event and mourning as a communal practice? Randolph's drawings remind us that we are embodied beings yearning for communion with one another, that we suffer pain and loss; that we struggle to transcend our bodies and our anguish by connecting with outer worlds and inner realms."

Lynn Randolph grew up in Port Arthur, Texas. She earned her BFA from the University of Texas in Austin. Her paintings have appeared in many texts as they inform topics such as feminism, religion, cultural studies, and contemporary art. Randolph's paintings have been exhibited and collected in permanent museum collections and other public and private institutions including: Bunting Institute at Radcliffe/Harvard; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC; Arizona State University Art Museum; San Antonio Museum of Art; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and The Menil Collection. In 2008,Randolph became an artist in residence at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Here she considers herself a translator helping patients realize their memories, dreams and reflections on their lives through art.

A Beloved’s Touch, 2015
Graphite on paper
18 x 24 inches

Susie Kalil is a former Core Fellow in Critical Studies at the Glassell School of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. A frequent contributor to publications including ArtNews, Art in America, Artforum, Sculpture and Cite, she also previously served as managing editor of the Texas art journal Artlies, as well as Spot magazine, Houston Center for Photography. For the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, she co-curated (with Barbara Rose) the landmark exhibition Fresh Paint: The Houston School and The Texas Landscape: 1900-1986. She previously served as Visual Arts Director, DiverseWorks, Houston.

Kalil is the author of the award-winning book Alexandre Hogue: An American Visionary (Texas A&M University Press) and curator of the Hogue retrospective, which traveled to the Art Museum of South Texas, the Grace Museum and the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History. She also co-curated the Hogue exhibition, which traveled to the Rockwell Museum (Corning, New York), the Dallas Museum of Art, and the Gilcrease Museum (Tulsa, Oklahoma). Kalil is the author of Dorothy Hood: The Color of Being/El Color del Ser (Texas A&M University Press) and curator of the Hood retrospective for the Art Museum of South Texas. She is currently at work on the monograph Roger Winter: Fire and Ice.

Jeffrey J. Kripal holds the J. Newton Rayzor Chair in Philosophy and Religious Thought at Rice University. Jeff is the author of numerous books, including Comparing Religions: Coming to Terms (with Ata Anzali, Andrea R. Jain, and Erin Prophet), Authors of the Impossible: The Paranormal and the Sacred and Esalen: America and the Religion of No Religion. He is presently working on a three-volume study of paranormal currents in American history for the University of Chicago Press.


Subconscious Sketching Workshop
Sunday, January 14, 2018
1–3 PM
Horton Gallery
$5 Lawndale Members; $10 Non-members

Lynn Randolph, A Beloved's Touch, 2015

Join Lawndale on Sunday, January 14th from 1 - 3 PM for a Subconscious Sketching Workshop inspired by Lynn Randolph's Between Worlds. In this workshop, participants will create graphite compositions that navigate consciousness through techniques of automatic writing and drawing.

This workshop is $5 for Lawndale members and $10 for non-members. All ages welcome! Space is limited (20). Purchase tickets here.

Workshop with Augusto Mora: Creating Comics and Developing the Imagination
Wednesday, January 17, 2018
5–6:30 PM

This workshop will be conducted in Spanish with live translation by Antena.
This workshop is free and open to the public.

Taller con Augusto Mora: Creando cómics y desarrollando la imaginación
Miércoles 17 de enero del  2018
5–6:30 PM

Este taller se llevará a cabo en español con interpretación en vivo proporcionada por Antena.
Este taller es gratis y abierto al público.

Join exhibiting artist Augusto Mora to create your own graphic novel! This workshop is divided into two parts. First, participants will review the essential steps necessary to create a comic (sequential art, storytelling, the script, drawing, style). Second, participants will engage in an exercise to enhance their creativity and imagination. Each participant will create a one-page comic book to take home. This workshop will be conducted in Spanish with live English translation provided by Antena.

Participation is free.

¡Únete al artista en exhibición, Augusto Mora, para crear tu propia novela gráfica! Este taller está dividido en dos partes. Primero, los participantes examinarán los pasos esenciales necesarios para crear un cómic (arte secuencial, narrativa, argumento, dibujo, estilo). Luego, los participantes participarán en un ejercicio para fomentar su creatividad e imaginación. Cada participante creará un cómic de una página que podrá llevarse a casa. Este taller se realizará en español con interpretación en inglés en vivo proporcionada por Antena.

Participación es gratis.

MARCH

Between Love & Madness: Mexican Comic Art from the 1970s
Organized by Christopher Sperandio in collaboration with
students from Practical Curation, Rice University
January 18–March 25, 2018
O'Quinn Gallery

Entre el amor y la locura: Arte del cómic mejicano de los 1970
Organizado por Christopher Sperandio en colaboración con 
estudiantes de Conservación Práctica de la Universidad de Rice
Del 18 de enero al 25 de marzo del 2018
Galería O'Quinn


Wildly popular in Mexico, the art of micro-cuentos, or “mini-tales,” are little known internationally. Beginning in the 1960s and continuing through the mid-seventies, these idiosyncratic Mexican comic books, measuring three by four and a half inches, present genre stories that carry subtle political critique. Between Love & Madness is comprised of approximately 380 works, including original interior art, original painted cover art, and ephemera.

Extremadamente popular en Méjico, el arte de los micro-cuentos, o “mini-historias”, es poco conocido internacionalmente. Desde sus inicios en los 1960 y continuando hasta mediados de los setenta, estos libros de cómic idiosincráticamente mejicanos de una medida de tres por cuatro y media pulgadas, presentan historias con una crítica política sutil. Entre el amor y la locura está compuesta de aproximadamente 380 obras, incluyendo arte original interior, pinturas originales de portadas y piezas de colección.

Jamal Cyrus x Jamire Williams: Boogaloo & The Midnite Hours
February 9–March 25, 2018
Horton Gallery
Essay by Charisse Weston

“And whatsoever master, owner or overseer shall permit or suffer his or their Negro or other slave or slaves, at any time hereafter, to beat drums, blow horns, or use any other loud instruments […], shall forfeit ten pounds, current money, for every such offence […]”

South Carolina Slave Code Article 36 (1740)

Taking as its starting point the phenomena of percussive “rudiments”, and in particular a drum pattern known as the “Boogaloo”, in this exhibition Jamire Williams and Jamal Cyrus artistically mine the most generative phases of Black musical evolution. Born out of the convergences between Africa and the Americas, the Boogaloo is a diasporic rhythm, speaking to multiple origins, and ways of being. Pulling from their respective disciplines of the Visual Arts and Sound, Cyrus and Williams delve into the graphic, sculptural, and sonic possibilities inherent within the tradition of Black music, mixing aspects of the past, present, and future into their recombinant formulas.

Jamal Cyrus is engrossed with the power and efficacy of images, the range of communicative and emotional registers found in material, the present and absent mimetic qualities of place, the divine properties of sound, the wondrous outcomes of selfless collaboration, the resonant and echoing qualities of words that eschew confinement to one meaning, the performative energy embedded in process, non-cochlear sound, the energetic recording capabilities of line, accumulative surfaces that tell time, and the healing properties within all of these.

Jamire Williams is a world renown musician and visual artist who has grown to sincerely feel that his purpose is to meld these mediums together in an organic, seamless fashion. A graduate of Houston’s acclaimed High School for the Performing & Visual Arts, Williams received his BFA from The New School in New York City in 2006. Since then he has grown into one of the leading voices of his generation performing and collaborating with such artist as Herbie Hancock, Solange, Madlib, Christian Scott and Chassol. He has also begun to journey into more conceptual spaces with abstract painting and curated installations. In 2012, he received the Harlem Stage Fund For New Work grant and was also an integral contributor to Jason Moran’s BLEED exhibition at the year’s Whitney Biennial. Williams released a solo concept record entitled ///// EFFECTUAL in 2016 where he explores the dimensions of the drum set in acoustic and electronic capacities accompanied by his personal paintings. “Jamire Williams shows himself to be an inspired crafter of sound, capable of building entire worlds from just his drum hits.” - Pitchfork

His goal is to push the envelope within these creative disciplines by performing in unconventional spaces and creating 2D and 3D still life works that join sound and structure to space and place."

Charisse Pearlina Weston is a conceptual artist and writer who interrogates language, representation, and history through the deconstruction and reconfiguration of text, photography, and archives of black experience. Her work been presented nationally in venues including Project Row Houses. She has participated in residencies at Alabama Song Houston, Atlantic Center for the Arts, and Vermont Studio Center. She has received awards from the Santo Foundation, the Sally Hands Foundation, the Dallas Museum of Art's Arch and Anne Giles Kimbrough Fund and was a 2016 Southern Constellations Fellow at the Elsewhere Museum in North Carolina. Her writing has been published in Art and Culture Texas, Pomona Valley Review, Not that But this, and she is the author of The Red Book of Houston: A Compendium for the New Black Metropolis (2015, self-published), A Vessel. A Case. A Fruit, for Touching (2016, self-published chapbook), and co-author of Fantasy Objects: an artist book of text and images (2014, onestar press).


Augusto Mora: ¿A Dónde Nos Llevan? (Where Are They Taking Us To?)
January 18–March 25, 2018
Cavnar Gallery

Augusto Mora: ¿A dónde nos llevan?
18 de enero al 25 de marzo del 2018
Galería Cavnar


Where Are They Taking Us To? is an exhibition based on the eponymously titled graphic novel by Augusto Mora, a comic artist based in Mexico City. Where Are They Taking Us To? attempts to provide the reader with a timeline of and framework for understanding the circumstances surrounding the disappearance of 43 students of Ayotzinapa’s Teacher Training College in Iguala, Guerrero, on September 26, 2014, and the subsequent demonstrations world-wide that demanded justice for the victims and their families.

¿A dónde nos llevan? es una exhibición basada en la novela gráfica homónima de Augusto Mora, un artista de cómic de la Ciudad de México. ¿A dónde nos llevan? intenta proporcionar al lector una cronología y un contexto para entender las circunstancias que rodean la desaparición de 43 estudiantes de la Escuela Normal Rural de Ayotzinapa.

Daniela Antelo: Intersections and Interactions on Language
February 9–March 25, 2018
Project Space
Essay by Georganne Boardman


Intersections and Interactions on Language, 2017, Image by Peter Molick

Intersections and Interactions on Language is a performance-based video work documenting nine separate interactions between the artist and nine strangers. Documented over a five-month period in 2017, the work examines the ways that communication can be forged when there is no common language to rely upon. The exhibition is accompanied by documentation unique to each of the nine interactions.

Daniela Antelo is a multi-disciplinary artist working in Houston, TX. She received her MFA in Sculpture from the University of Houston in 2015. Her works involve performance and audience participation through time-based installations. She is interested in process more than final product. Her inspiration often comes from the potential of the random and collaboration is a major part of her work. She has performed and shown work at institutions such as Diverse Works, Alabama Song, University of Houston's Blaffer Gallery, The Barn, Asia Society, The Wortham Theater and Hope Stone Center.

Georganne Boardman left the world of visual merchandising and retail display design to earn a BA in Anthropology at the University of Houston in 2013. After interning at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston in American Painting and Sculpting she combined her love of art history and human behavior by earning her MA in Art History from UH in 2017, studying American scholarship of Yves Klein's Anthropometrie series. As a former fine arts student of blown glass, painting and drawing, Georganne is currently assisting artists with their writing needs as she pursues her own freelance writing projects.


Michelle Matthews: Sculpted
February 9–March 25, 2018
Sculpture Garden
Essay by Perry Price

Sculpted, 2017, Image by Peter Molick

Using traditional methods such as hand-formed clay coils and carving techniques, ceramic artist Michelle Matthews constructs intuitive forms that balance formal integrity and chance. For this site-specific installation, Matthews will create a large-scale, interactive work comprised of nine clay-based sculptures that will be subject to the natural effects of Houston’s environment for the duration of the exhibition.

Michelle Matthews, born in New Jersey, has called Houston home since 1981. She received her ceramic education at the MFAH Glassell School of Art, completing the Glassell's BLOCK program in 2016. Matthews' ceramic sculptures reflect her love of processes, those found in geological development and those discovered while working in clay. Her work has been exhibited in solo shows at Galeria Regina, Houston, TX in 2015 and 2016, as well as many group exhibits at Coconino Center for the Arts, Flagstaff, AZ; LH Horton Jr. Gallery, Stockton, CA and at the Baltimore Clayworks, MD. Currently, she is curating Collective Transference: An Exhibit of Houston Area Ceramic Artists, a ceramic exhibit on view at the Art Gallery at Houston Community College Central Campus January 23–February 17, 2018.

Perry A. Price is Executive Director of Houston Center for Contemporary Craft in Houston, Texas. Price received a BA in the History of Art from the Johns Hopkins University and an MA in Museum Studies from the Cooperstown Graduate Program in Museum Studies, State University of New York Oneonta and the New York State Historical Association. Prior to joining the HCCC, he served as director of education for the American Craft Council in Minneapolis, Minnesota


Raw Ceramic Workshop with Artist Michelle Matthews
Sunday, March 4, 2018
1 - 3 PM
$5 - Lawndale Members
$10 - Non-members



Join Lawndale and ceramicist Michelle Matthews on Sunday, March 4 from 1-3 PM for our Raw Ceramic Workshop inspired by the works in Matthews' Sculpted exhibition on view in the Mary E. Bawden Sculpture Garden. In this artist-led workshop, participants will create raw clay vessels while exploring ancient clay techniques.

This workshop is $5 for Lawndale Members and $10 for non-members. All ages and skill levels are welcome! Click here to purchase tickets and reserve your seats today. Seating is limited (20).

Conversation with Daniela Antelo and Georganne Boardman
Sunday, March 11, 2018
1 - 3 PM



Join Lawndale Sunday, March 11 from 1 - 3 PM for a conversation with Intersections and Interactions on Language artist Daniela Antelo and writer Georgeanne Boardman. In this conversation, Antelo and Boardman will discuss Antelo's exhibition, alternative forms of communication, and cross-cultural experiences.

This event is free and open to the public.

SPEAKEASY
featuring Jamire Williams

Friday, March 23, 2018
8 PM
Doors open at 7:30 PM

Free Admission

Image courtesy of the artist.

Playing with concepts established on his recent solo album, ///// EFFECTUAL, Williams will explore how spirituality and abstraction are made manifest through the nuanced sounds made on his drum set.

Jamire Williams is a world renown musician and visual artist who has grown to sincerely feel that his purpose is to meld these mediums together in an organic, seamless fashion. A graduate of Houston’s acclaimed High School for the Performing & Visual Arts, Williams received his BFA from The New School in New York City in 2006. Since then he has grown into one of the leading voices of his generation performing and collaborating with such artist as Herbie Hancock, Solange, Madlib, Christian Scott and Chassol. He has also begun to journey into more conceptual spaces with abstract painting and curated installations. In 2012, he received the Harlem Stage Fund For New Work grant and was also an integral contributor to Jason Moran’s BLEED exhibition at the year’s Whitney Biennial. Williams released a solo concept record entitled ///// EFFECTUAL in 2016 where he explores the dimensions of the drum set in acoustic and electronic capacities accompanied by his personal paintings. “Jamire Williams shows himself to be an inspired crafter of sound, capable of building entire worlds from just his drum hits.” - Pitchfork

His goal is to push the envelope within these creative disciplines by performing in unconventional spaces and creating 2D and 3D still life works that join sound and structure to space and place."

Conversation with Jamal Cyrus x Jamire Williams
Sunday, March 25, 2018
2 PM
Horton Gallery



Join Lawndale Sunday, March 25 at 2 PM for a Conversation with Jamal Cyrus and Jamire Williams, whose Boogaloo & The Midnite Hours is on view in Horton Gallery until Sunday, March 25. During this conversation, Cyrus and Williams will speak about the creation of this exhibition and how it relates to their body of work.

This event is free and open to the public.


Lawndale Art Center

Lawndale Art Center develops local contemporary artists and the audience for their art.

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